MAP Sensor Replacement on 2003-2007 Accord

If you’re battling a P0105, P0106, P0107, P0108 or P0109 code, it may well be the manifold absolute pressure (MAP) sensor that has gone south and would need a replacement. Of course you would want to rule out poor wiring connections first and other differential diagnosis for the codes. The MAP sensor measures the level of vacuum in the intake manifold. This measured vacuum is used by the car’s computer to calculate engine load and also control the volume of air for the tight air-fuel mix which is kept at 14.7 to 1 respectively for optimum MPGs. Not all vehicles feature a MAP sensor, some makes use of a mass air flow (MAF) sensor instead, while others feature both sensors; with the MAP being sort of a backup in case the MAF failed.

A poorly functioning/bad MAP sensor may affect  fuel economy, produce rough idling and hurt overall performance. In my case, I was troubleshooting a rich condition on my 2003 Honda Accord and decided give the MAP sensor a good clean since I had no check engine light or pending codes. Live readings for the MAP also didn’t look off. Guess I’m doing this just to satisfy my conscience. 🙁

Materials:

  • Philips screwdriver
  • Flat-tip screwdriver
  • 10mm size wrench

Steps:

1. Find the location of the MAP sensor: The sensor is usually located on the intake manifold. On the 2003 Accord LX, the sensor has a white & blue sticker and is found just after the throttle body. It does have MAP sensor written on it.

How to replace a MAP sensor

Location of the MAP sensor on the 2003 Accord LX

2. Detach the connector for the MAP sensor: Depress the tab to remove the connector.

MAP sensor replacement on 2003-2007 Accord

Removing the electrical connector to the MAP sensor

3. Remove obstructing mounting brackets: Unscrew the 10mm bolt mounting the battery positive cable to the intake manifold. Also remove the 10mm bolt mounting the vacuum line to the intake manifold.

Removing bracket holding the +ve battery cable to the intake manifold

Removing the bracket holding the +ve battery cable to the intake manifold

Removing the bracket for the vacuum line to the intake manifold manifold intake

Removing the bracket for the vacuum line to the intake manifold manifold

You may actually be able to pull off this DIY without taking my step 2, but I’ve learnt in my DIY journey to rather create ample work space than work in tight spaces. You’re less likely to make mistakes this way.

4. Unscrew the single MAP sensor screw: A Philips screwdriver would be required for this, however like I found out, the screw was banged on pretty hard and simply stripped as I tried with the Philips screwdriver.

If this happens to you, there’s a simple trick to repair the screw head; use a saw to cut a groove for a flat-tip screwdriver on the stripped screw head.

fixing stripped screws or bolts

Cutting a groove for a flat-tip screwdriver on the stripped screw

fixing stripped screw heads

Groove created on stripped screw head

MAP sensor removal and install

Unscrewing the stripped MAP sensor screw

Once the screw is out, wiggle the sensor to get it out. You can now go ahead to install the new one, following reverse steps.

cleaning MAP sensors

Cleaning the MAP sensors

For me, I embarked on this to see if the sensor was dirty and thus contributing to the rich condition I was having. In the end the sensor was squeaky clean on inspection. I did give it a bath with electronic cleaner just to satisfy my conscience. NB: If you do try to clean your MAP sensor, do not use carb cleaner, its too harsh and may ruin the sensor and the plastic housing. Hope you found this useful!

5 Comments

Comments - Have your Say!

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.